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Rubik’s Cube + Scrabble = Scruble Cube

Scruble Cube

Most of us are pretty familiar with both Scrabble and the Rubik’s Cube, but have you heard of the Scruble Cube?  No?  Well, I hadn’t either until I was introduced to it through the Homeschool Crew.  As soon as I saw it, I was intrigued, and I admit, a little intimidated.  Hmmm….  So, not only do I need to come up with words like in Scrabble, but I also need to be able to plan everything out and rotate a cube to be able to score points.  **gulp**

Game Play

Players take turn forming words on the cube.  The letters all need to be in a row (not diagonal), but they can go around the cube allowing for a larger point score.  There are premium “tiles” on the cube which allow for a larger score as well.  Depending on the game play chosen, these tiles can either be wild card tiles (replacing a letter in a word) or point value tiles or some combination of the two.  That’s the nice thing about this game – you can make your own set of rules.  The player’s turn can be timed (with the included timer) or untimed.  Obviously, for fairness, rules need to be determined up front.  You can set a time limit on the game or a score limit.  The highest point value at the end of the time or the first person to that point value wins.

Ease of Use

The cube itself is very easy to use.  When you first receive it, it may be a little stiff, so you’ll have to carefully rotate the cube to loosen it up a bit.  The instructions point out that you should only make one turn at a time.  Forcing the cube to turn when it’s stuck could end up with a broken cube.  The letters and special tiles are actually circles that rotate on each square on the cube which allow easier reading of letters/words during game play.  The stickers on these circles (think turn tables) may slide with time.  (We’ve seen this happen with a couple of letters.)  The makers of Scruble Cube have taken this into consideration and offer a replacement set of stickers to purchase.

Educational Value

Because of the way this cube is set up, players will need to use not only spelling skills but also logic skills to receive the highest point value in the game.  In addition, the makers of Scruble Cube have come up with several educational activities to allow use of the cube in the classroom to enhance learning.  (I love it when learning can be hands on and fun.)

Final Thoughts

As soon as this arrived, Daddy and Munchkin were fighting over who would get to play with it first.  I was a little concerned with how it would hold up to repeated use as it didn’t feel as durable as some other cube games, but I was pleased to see that even after some accidental drops and a few kicks from the dog it’s no worse for wear.  My poor mommy brain seems to have difficulty thoroughly utilizing this game, but it seems to click for Munchkin.  Daddy thinks it’s cool, and he likes that you have to use both logic and spelling.  The game seriously makes you think.

The Scruble Cube retails for $24.95 and would make a fun, unique gift for both adults and kids.

I received a Scruble Cube as part of the TOS Crew to help facilitate the writing of a frank and honest review. A positive review in not guaranteed, and all opinions are my own.

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