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Wordless Wednesday: Gluten Free Pumpkin Pie

Gluten Free Pumpkin Pies

Gluten Free Pumpkin Pie Slice

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Beef Stew Recipe for Pressure Canning

Beef Stew with Canning Instructions

The weather is getting cooler, so it’s time to start making soups and stews. Since I have a pressure canner this year, I am able to can our stew for use later without having to freeze it. This means that it’s easy for Daddy to grab a jar of stew, warm it up, and put it in a thermos to eat for lunch.

Making beef stew at home means you can control the quality and quantity of the ingredients. This beef stew recipe was a hit with my family, and it includes canning instructions for shelf-stable storage using a pressure canner. This naturally gluten free recipe is perfect for the cool fall and winter days.

D has decided the stew needs more meat. Of course, he always wants more meat with his meals. Munchkin, on the other hand, loves all the potatoes and carrots as they are her favorite part of the stew. I think the next time that I make it I may have more meat in some jars and less in others so they can each their favorite type of stew.

I had leftover broth, so I used it to can some carrots instead of just using water.

Beef Stew with Canning Instructions

Beef Stew Recipe

(Recipe adjusted from the Ball recipe)

Ingredients:

  • 4 lbs grassfed beef stew meat cut into 1.5 inch pieces
  • 1 Tbsp. coconut or olive oil
  • 12 cups peeled and cubed red or yellow organic potatoes
  • 8 cups “cubed” organic carrots
  • 3 cups chopped organic celery
  • 3 cups chopped organic white or yellow onion
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp thyme (fresh if you have it)
  • 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper

Directions:

  1. Brown meat in oil in large stock pot.
  2. Add vegetables and seasonings to browned meat.
  3. Cover meat with boiling water and bring stew to a boil. Once it boils, remove it from the heat. (You’re not completely cooking the stew as it will be cooked during the canning process.)
  4. Ladle hot stew into hot jars leaving a 1 inch headspace.
  5. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rims and adjust lids until fit is fingertip tight.
  6. Process filled jars in a pressure canner according to these times:
    1. For Pints – 1 hour and 15 minutes at 10 lbs if less than 1,000 ft OR 15 lbs if above 1,000 ft.
    2. For Quarts – 1 hours and 30 minutes at 10 lbs in less than 1,000 ft OR 15 lbs if above 1,000 ft.
  7. Start the timing process once the weighted gauge begins to jiggle.
  8. Once the timing process is complete, turn off the heat and let the canner completely depressurize. (Do not remove the weight until the canner is depressurized.)
  9. After the canner is depressurized, remove the weight and wait 10 more minutes.
  10. After 10 minutes, unfasten the lid and carefully remove it – lifting away from your face.
  11. Remove the jars with a jar lifter and place on a towel leaving at least 1 inch between the jars.
  12. Allow the jars to sit undisturbed to 12 to 24 hours and then check to verify they have properly sealed.
Beef Stew Recipe for Pressure Canning
 
Making beef stew at home means you can control the quality and quantity of the ingredients. This beef stew recipe includes canning instructions for shelf-stable storage using a pressure canner.
Author:
Recipe type: Soup
Ingredients
  • 4 lbs grassfed beef stew meat cut into 1.5 inch pieces
  • 1 Tbsp. coconut or olive oil
  • 12 cups peeled and cubed red or yellow organic potatoes
  • 8 cups “cubed” organic carrots
  • 3 cups chopped organic celery
  • 3 cups chopped organic white or yellow onion
  • 1½ Tbsp sea salt
  • 2 tsp thyme (fresh if you have it)
  • 1 tsp fresh cracked pepper
Instructions
  1. Brown meat in oil in large stock pot.
  2. Add vegetables and seasonings to browned meat.
  3. Cover meat with boiling water and bring stew to a boil. Once it boils, remove it from the heat. (You’re not completely cooking the stew as it will be cooked during the canning process.)
  4. Ladle hot stew into hot jars leaving a 1 inch headspace.
  5. Remove air bubbles. Wipe rims and adjust lids until fit is fingertip tight.
  6. Process filled jars in a pressure canner according to these times:
  7. For Pints – 1 hour and 15 minutes at 10 lbs if less than 1,000 ft OR 15 lbs if above 1,000 ft.
  8. For Quarts – 1 hours and 30 minutes at 10 lbs in less than 1,000 ft OR 15 lbs if above 1,000 ft.
  9. Start the timing process once the weighted gauge begins to jiggle.
  10. Once the timing process is complete, turn off the heat and let the canner completely depressurize. (Do not remove the weight until the canner is depressurized.)
  11. After the canner is depressurized, remove the weight and wait 10 more minutes.
  12. After 10 minutes, unfasten the lid and carefully remove it – lifting away from your face.
  13. Remove the jars with a jar lifter and place on a towel leaving at least 1 inch between the jars.
  14. Allow the jars to sit undisturbed to 12 to 24 hours and then check to verify they have properly sealed.
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Review: MAGNAblade


Magnablade

Special thanks to the company for providing a sample.

Razors and razor blade replacements are expensive, so I liked the idea of something that increased the life of a razor blade. When I was given the opportunity to try out MAGNAblade, I thought it was worth trying. MAGNAblade comes with the razor dock as well as a razor.

There are two color choices for the razor dock – island coral and forest green. As stated above the set comes with the razor dock and a  chrome bladed razor with a 5 blade head. Replacement razor heads are available for purchase separately. The initial set is $24.95 with free shipping in the U.S.

Magnablade Razor Comparision

The company states that the razor dock works for most razors, but unfortunately, that was not the case for us. We had three different razors in the house: the Schick Intuition, the Schick Hydro Silk, and the Schick Quattro. I didn’t expect the Intuition to work because it’s not a traditional razor head, but I’m including it in my comparisons as it is a razor that I normally use.

Magnablade Razor Head Comparison

The razor on the far right is the one that comes with the MAGNAblade razor dock. As you can see, it is a very thin razor head. It slides in the razor dock very easily and stays securely.

Magnablade Fit

The only other razor that we had in the house that would fit into the razor dock was the Schick Quattro, and that was a tight fit. The razor dock is not set up for a thicker or wider razor head. This is definitely something to keep in mind if you have a favorite razor that you want to keep using rather than the razor that comes with the razor dock.

The video above shows how the razor dock works to keep the blade sharp longer. So the question is, did it work for me? Yes, the dock did appear to keep the blade sharp longer which means that it can cut down on the cost of razors and/or razor heads.

I’m on the fence about this product as it does work as expected, but I can’t use it with most of the razors that we normally use at our house. I don’t like the idea of being locked into using one specific type of razor even if it means a longer life of the blades. That being said, it does work with Munchkin’s razor, so she’s happy to have her razors last longer.

I received one or more of the products mentioned above for free using Tomoson.com. Regardless, I only recommend products or services I use personally and believe will be good for my readers.

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Homemade Canned Cranberry Jelly

Canned Cranberry Jelly

Munchkin and Daddy love their cranberry jelly. You know. The kind that comes out of the can in the shape of a can. This year, I really wanted to make my own so I could control the ingredients. I was able to use organic ingredients that were not processed or minimally processed. I decided to keep the skins on the cranberries so I used the blender to create the puree. I also decided to add just a little orange extract for a little brightness. I found the cute half pint jars and used those in addition to regular wide mouth pint jars.

Cranberry Jelly RecipeCanned Cranberry Jelly Recipe

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds whole cranberries (organic when possible)
  • 3 cups sugar (organic, raw sugar when possible)
  • 1 cup apple cider (organic, raw when possible)
  • 1/4 tsp orange extract or 1 Tbsp orange juice (optional)

Directions:

  1. Wash and remove any bad cranberries.
  2. Combine cranberries, sugar, apple cider, and orange extract/juice (if desired) in a large sauce pan.
  3. Simmer gently over medium-low heat until cranberries are tender. Stir frequently to avoid burning the mixture.
  4. Press through sieve or food mill OR puree in a blender. If you use the blender option, be very careful as the mixture is hot.
  5. Pour mixture into clean, hot jars leaving 1/2 inch head space. Wipe the rims and adjust lids. If you are going to use immediately or store in the refrigerator, you can stop here.
  6. For processing in a water bath canner, place the jars in the hot water making sure the water covers the jars by 1 to 2 inches.
  7. Bring canner back up to a boil and then start timing using the following processing times:
    1. 0-1,000 ft = 15 minutes
    2. 1,001-6,000 ft = 20 minutes
    3. above 6,000 ft = 25 minutes
  8. After processing time has completed, turn off the heat and remove carefully remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes before removing the jars.
  9. Use a jar lifter to remove the jars and place them on a towel leaving at least 1 inch between jars while they cool.
  10. Let jars sit for 12 to 24 hours and check to make sure they completely sealed.

Approximate Yield: 3 pints if run through sieve/food mill or 3 1/2 pints if pureed in a blender.

 

Homemade Canned Cranberry Jelly
 
Traditional cranberry jelly with instructions for water bath canning.
Author:
Recipe type: Side Dish
Serves: 3 to 3.5 pints
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds whole cranberries (organic when possible)
  • 3 cups sugar (organic, raw sugar when possible)
  • 1 cup apple cider (organic, raw when possible)
  • ¼ tsp orange extract or 1 Tbsp orange juice (optional)
Instructions
  1. Wash and remove any bad cranberries.
  2. Combine cranberries, sugar, apple cider, and orange extract/juice (if desired) in a large sauce pan.
  3. Simmer gently over medium-low heat until cranberries are tender. Stir frequently to avoid burning the mixture.
  4. Press through sieve or food mill OR puree in a blender. If you use the blender option, be very careful as the mixture is hot.
  5. Pour mixture into clean, hot jars leaving ½ inch head space. Wipe the rims and adjust lids. If you are going to use immediately or store in the refrigerator, you can stop here.
  6. For processing in a water bath canner, place the jars in the hot water making sure the water covers the jars by 1 to 2 inches.
  7. Bring canner back up to a boil and then start timing using the following processing times:
  8. -1,000 ft = 15 minutes
  9. ,001-6,000 ft = 20 minutes
  10. above 6,000 ft = 25 minutes
  11. After processing time has completed, turn off the heat and remove carefully remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes before removing the jars.
  12. Use a jar lifter to remove the jars and place them on a towel leaving at least 1 inch between jars while they cool.
  13. Let jars sit for 12 to 24 hours and check to make sure they completely sealed.

 

 

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Review: 44 Animals of the Bible by Nancy Pelander Johnson

44 Animals of the BibleSpecial thanks to Master Books for providing a sample copy of this book.

Book Description:

God watches when the doe gives birth to her fawn. He makes the leopard swift to hunt its prey. From the exotic ibex to the more commonly-known tortoise, these and other wonderful creatures of this book will delight children and parents during an exploration of where each animal appears in Scripture!

God cares for the animals and He wants us to do the same, as they represent some of the most amazing and unique creatures that He has designed. Learn their importance and connections to biblical events and develop understanding of their place in the Bible with this delightful presentation.

About the Author:

Nancy Johnson graduated with a B.A. from the University of Colorado, and continues to write and travel throughout the United States, Mexico, and Canada. Lloyd R. Hight worked for various advertising agencies, designing several covers for RCA records, and developing a variety of projects for Master Books.

Book Details:

  • Hardcover: 45 pages
  • Publisher: Master Books a division of New Leaf Publishing (September 4, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0890518432
  • ISBN-13: 978-0890518434
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 8 x 0.4 inches
  • Retail Price: $9.99
  • Electronic versions also available

My Thoughts:

44 Animals of the Bible features the following animals in alphabetical order: ant, asp, badger, chameleon, deer, dove, eagle, fly, fox, frog, gier, goat, hare, hawk, heron, horse, hyena, ibex, kite, lamb, leopard, lizard, mole, mouse, nighthawk, osprey, ostrich, owl, palmerworm, peacock, pelican, pygarg, quail, ram, scorpion, sparrow, swallow, turtledove, tortoise, unicorn, viper, vulture, weasel, and whale.

Each animal has a 1 page entry that gives information about the animal including how the Bible describes the attributes of the animal and/or the lessons we can learn from the animal. It also has a scripture passage about the animal as well as a watercolor image.

As a horse owner, I was completely puzzled by the horse entry where it stated that horses couldn’t be ridden in rocky places because they didn’t have horseshoes. This is not true, and it’s a shame that more research wasn’t done by the author to know that horses can indeed be ridden in rocky terrain without horseshoes.

Putting aside the incorrect information on horses, I did like the layout of this book and how the information was presented. It would be nice for preschool and elementary age children who are interested in animals, and it could be used as a devotional with younger children.

Moms of Master Books Disclosure Statement

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